Cornwall

And now for something completely different..

Sometimes it’s just fun to see where things can go with a photograph.  This is one of my most sucessful images turned into a jigsaw then blown apart using the 3D tools available within Photoshop to reveal the gem of the photograph, within a globe, and with a photograph of the Milky Way I took behind.  I had to photograph my own hand and then isolate it to create the illusion of the hand holding the globe.  Why, well why not?  For those curious, this is the engine house used in the opening titles to Poldark.


Season’s Greetings

Perhaps not the most seasonal of images for many but the reality of the weather at time in the UK now is for rather warm, often wet, conditions so I’ve avoided posting a snowy picture from Iceland and instead, decided to post this picture, taken at Priest’s Cove in Cornwall very close to Lands End, the most south-westerly point in the UK, a few days ago.  It looks like Christmas Day is set to reach a record high, temperature wise this year so perhaps the Christmas Card industry, at least in the UK will have to start to re-thinking their snowy Christmas cards.

I’d like to wish all the followers of my blog a Happy Christmas, Happy Hanukkah (as I understand the two celebrations coincide this year) and to season’s greetings, happy holidays to everyone else, however and whatever you celebrate.

It’s been a turbulent year on so many levels around the world so lets hope for better in 2017.  That will certainly be my Christmas wish.

Catch up in the New Year.  All the very best. Adrian :-)

priests-cove18mm f/11 1/320 sec. ISO-100

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2

 


Book Covers

I was informed today of another two book covers I can add to my name.  One of the books is  La Tour de Malvent by Gilbert Bordes.  The cover can be seen below.  This cover is taken from a photograph I took of Roche Rock (A print of which hangs in my hall) taken a mile from my then home in Cornwall.  This hermitage and chapel dates back to the 12th century and was used as a location in the Hollywood Film, Omen III – The Final Conflict.  It’s an interesting place to visit and has a lot of history and folklore surrounding it.  Having been there before first light for a dawn shoot, I can testify it’s not somewhere you really want to visit, in the dark, on your own.  The imagination really does start to do overtime. :-)

The other, Ildarnet by S. K. Tremayne is to be published in Denmark and I do not have a copy of that cover yet.  However, it is the same image that was used for my first ever book cover.  The photograph, one of my favourites of all time, I’ve included below.  This picture has been incredibly good to me.  Regular followers of my blog will have seen it quite a few times now.  This was one of the first pictures I took when I picked up a digital camera for the first time, just under four years ago.

The picture happened.  It was a cold, grey, miserable day in December and for those of you who know Cornwall, you’ll know just how miserable that can be.  However, I’d ordered myself a Christmas present from Amazon.  I had my shiny new Nikon D7000 and I was going to get out there and take pictures regardless of the weather..

As it turned out, I was in the right place at the right time.  The conditions, that on the face of it were not particularly promising, proved to be perfect. As I was setting up my tripod on the sand, a shaft of sunlight broke through the heavy cloud, hit the engine house and I had my picture.  I’ve been chasing such conditions ever since. This is why it’s so important to just get out there and take pictures. The more pictures you take the better.  You just never know when you’re going to be in the right place at the right time to capture that special image.

If you’re considering joining an agency to make your pictures available for things like book covers, check the small print.  Make sure that you know what you’re signing up for and what rights you might be signing away.

9782258114500
wheal-coatesAdrian Theze Photo logo_2


Bude and the North Cornish/Devon Coast..

I have just returned from a week of much needed R&R staying in a lovely barn conversion just outside Bude in North Cornwall with my good friends Poppy and AJ.  Poppy is now blogging again with a shiny new photography and art blog so if you haven’t checked it out yet, follow this link.

The north Cornish and Devon coast is rugged, the surf fantastic and as ever for me, a pleasure to visit.  One particular feature of Bude is that it has a sea pool.  The pools were constructed in the 20’s and 30’s for people to be able to enjoy a swim in the sea, without having to swim in the sea.  A safe environment without the waves and treacherous currents so much a feature of many Cornish beaches and coves.  These pools cropped up all over the country but few now remain.  The Bude Sea Pool has been restored with donations and fundraising and for both Poppy and myself, a sure fire subject for a photograph or two.  The pool is replenished with fresh sea water at every high tide and it was high tide that was bound to elicit the best pictures.

With spring tides in the offing and occuring very accommodatingly at around 10 in the morning, on one of the few sunnier days, we were there, tripods at the ready.  Surfers often use the pool to launch themselves into the water, timing the moment with great precision.  I was able to capture one such surfer, contemplating and timing the waves.  This picture forms part of the series below.  I hope you enjoy them.. :-)

bude-sea-pool-878870mm f/11 15 sec. ISO100

bude-sea-pool-880134mm f/11 15 sec. ISO-100

bude-sea-pool-896724mm f/4 0.8 sec. ISO-100

bude-sea-pool-895724mm f/4 0.8 sec. ISO-100

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2

 


Book Covers..

It’s always nice when your work is recognised and I’m really pleased that one of my photos has been chosen for the cover of The Malice of the Waves, a thriller by Mark Douglas-Home which is to be published on the 19th of May by Penguin.  My photograph is featured on the hardback edition.

Here’s the book cover..

Malice of the Waves

Copyright Adrian Theze and Arcangel images

 

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer


All Mapped Out..

Truro and Falmouth Ordinance Survey Landranger Map photo by Adrian Theze

If you want a map with lots of detail, great if you enjoy hiking, cycling or just enjoy a nice gentle stroll, the map of choice in the UK is Ordnance Survey.

Ordnance Survey (OS) is the national mapping agency for Great Britain and is one of the world’s largest producers of maps. Since the first of April 2015 it has operated as Ordnance Survey Ltd, a government-owned company that is 100% publicly owned.

The agency’s name indicates its original military purpose, mapping Scotland in the wake of the Jacobite rebellion in 1745. There was also a more general and nationwide need for maps in light of the potential threat of invasion during the Napoleonic Wars, reflected in the inclusion of the War Department’s broad arrow in the agency’s logo up until 2015.

Ordnance Survey mapping is usually classified as either “large-scale” (in other words, more detailed) or “small-scale”. The Survey’s large-scale mapping comprises maps at six inches to the mile or more (1:10,560,  superseded by 1:10,000 in the 1950s) and was available as sheets until the 1980s, when it was digitised. Small-scale mapping comprises maps at less than six inches to the mile, such as the popular one inch to the mile “leisure” maps and their metric successors. These are still available in traditional sheet form.

This year Ordnance Survey decided to update their cover photos and I’m really pleased to say that one of my photographs will now adorn Map 204, Truro and Falmouth, part of the very popular 1:50,000 Landranger series.  The picture was taken of Fowey from across the Fowey River on a footpath known as Hall Walk.  You take the Bodinnick Ferry from Fowey and a little way up the road, the foot path begins on your right.

I’ve done a bit of cut and pasting to show how the map will look (roughly).  The photograph was taken on one of the most glorious June Mornings I can remember.  It was just a perfect day and to have that day immortalised (well nearly) on the cover of a map covering my area of Cornwall, that makes me happy.  This is a walk that I couldn’t manage today so it’s extra special and it’ll be very nice keepsake to have.  The new maps will be available from February next year.  I hope many visitors to the area will enjoy days similar to that one, although it has to be said, over the last few years these days, weather wise have been rare.. :-)

Truro and Falmouth Ordinance Survey Landranger Map photo by Adrian Theze

 

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2
Spacer
Spacer


New Beginnings..

For many, the autumn heralds the onset of winter, the end of summer, a season that engenders melancholy and sadness.  For me, perhaps it’s because I was born in October, autumn is a time for new beginnings and it’s probably my favourite season.  From a photographic point of view the opportunities are endless.

In keeping with my many new beginnings, new school years, new schools, that giant leap from school to university and being away from home for the first time, this autumn is no exception.  I’ve taken the leap from teaching workshops in Cornwall to teaching week-long photography courses in Iceland.  This has been in the planning for many months.  I’ve made many friends in Iceland in the process.  There hasn’t been so much time for photography or blogging but everything is now in place.  I finished the website last night and we’re good to go.

Hvaines IV

The courses are aimed at photographers of all levels.  For those that need it, we quickly cut through the unnecessary (in my opinion) complications and jargon that photo journalists regurgitate endlessly (well they’ve got to write about something I suppose) that keeps many new photographers floundering, to the fundamentals of exposure and the manual operation of your camera.  From there, we get to what’s really important.  The more esoteric aspects of photography that are perhaps harder to teach and for this reason, are overlooked by many of the photography courses and workshops out there.

Sneafellsness Peninsular

We concentrate on unravelling the person behind the viewfinder, investigating their relationship with the camera and subject and exploring why this is so important in terms of developing photographically.  In this process we take the photographer beyond the snapshot, beyond creating facsimiles of a scene to creating pieces of art that reflect the person making the pictures.  In the process we develop that all important photographic voice that sets individual photographers and their work apart.  Something that’s so important in a world awash with imagery.

Stokksnes, East Iceland

To do this I’ve deliberately chosen a location that in my mind cannot fail to inspire, enthrall and contribute hugely to this process that I’m describing.  For me Iceland has it all and I can’t think of a better place in which to teach photography.  I’m sure that by the end of the course, those attending will be as smitten as I am and will no doubt return to continue their journey..

Some of you may have noticed the Iceland in Focus link in the footer of my blog.  This widget links to my website where course details and dates can be found.  I look forward to seeing some of you in Iceland.  I’ll be there for the next couple of weeks.  I have a few meetings to attend but for the most part, I’m looking forward to lots of photography!  ;-)

SpacerAd WordPress

SpacerP.S. For the month of October, if you quote CPB0092 at checkout, there’s a special discount for readers of this blog.. :-)

Spacer


Golitha Wood

It was a lovely day yesterday so I took a trip to Golitha Wood through which the River Fowey runs.  The river rises at Fowey Well (originally Cornish: Fenten Fowi, meaning spring of the river Fowey) about 1-mile (1.6 km) north-west of Brown Willy on Bodmin Moor, not far from one of its tributaries rising at Dozmary Pool and Colliford Lake.  The river passes Lanhydrock House, Restormel Castle and Lostwithiel, then broadens at Milltown before joining the English Channel at Fowey.

Golitha Falls and the River Fowey14mm F/22 3 sec. ISO-50

SpacerFungi at Golitha Wood14mm f/8 1/2 sec. ISO-50

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerMe (2)Spacer


Summer..

This is a photograph of the Wheal Coates engine house from the beach at Chapel Porth

We’ve been having some very pleasant sunny days here in Cornwall over the last couple of weeks.  The wind has been cold which has kept the edge off the heat which for me is a positive thing.  MS Symptoms are exacerbated by the heat, perhaps this is why I’m enjoying Iceland so much.  The weather today is warm, muggy, dull and wet, quite a change so I’d thought I’d cheer myself up and process a picture I took of one of my favourite signature view down on Chapel Porth beach the other morning.  The tide was coming in allowing me to capture a nice reflection of the Wheal Coates engine house in the sand. Wet feet were the inevitable side effect but it was worth it I think.  Hopefully the sun will be back with us by Sunday..

This is a photograph of the Wheal Coates engine house from the beach at Chapel Porth 35mm f/8 1/320 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerSpacer


Cornish Sunset..

It feels like an age since I posted some pictures from Cornwall so here are some pictures I took last evening.  As the sun started to go down, it really looked promising so I suggested to Poppy of www.poppytump.wordpress.com (who is visiting at the moment) that we go over to Constantine Bay to watch the sunset.  We were not disappointed!

Constantine Bay Sunset35mm f/11 1/60 sec. ISO-100

spaceConstantine Bay35mm f/11 1/25 sec. ISO-100

spaceConstantine Bay35mm f/11 1/20 sec. ISO-100

space

We were not the only ones to head to Constantine Bay.  The beach was lined with people just watching and taking pictures with just about every device capable of taking a picture imaginable.  This person was happy just to sit on the fence and watch however..Constantine Bay35mm f/11 1/6 sec. ISO-100

spaceAdrian Theze Photo logo_2space


Black and White Challenge Day 4 – Constantine Bay

It’s day four of the five day black and white challenge that Sue J kindly invited me to take up.  I don’t usually get involved in these kinds of challenges but this one seemed very timely given I’ve been exploring black and white film.  My first two images, came from my film cameras and were planned black and white photographs.  Yesterday’s photo was a digital conversion from a colour photograph as is this picture.  The difference with this one is that with grey skies, ocean and rocks, the image was very monochromatic to start with, the conversion wasn’t a huge leap. This is a double, long, exposure, accentuating I think, the dynamic nature of wind and tide. The picture was taken on the beach at Constantine Bay here in Cornwall. Something a little different.  Click on the picture for a larger and sharper view, it does make a difference.. :-)

Constantine Bay28mm f/22 482 seconds ISO-100

Today I’d like to invite Mike to take up the challenge.  Mike frequently treats us to some superb black and white photography on his blog Mike’s Look at Life.  I’m hoping he’ll share some more over the next five days but only if time allows of course..

I’m happy to say that Angi has taken up the challenge and you can see her black and white photos on her blog, Moments in Time

spaceAdrian Theze logo

space


Black and White Challenge – Day 3

For day 3 of the 5 day black and white challenge, I’ve gone back to my roots as it were.  I guess I’m best known for my landscape photography work so I suppose it’s fitting that I post a few black and white landscape photographs but this presented me with a problem because for the most part, I’m not a fan of black and white landscape photography.  I love colour.  Why hide so much of what makes our planet so beautiful by taking away the colour?

I was very much of the same opinion when it came to photographing flowers in monochrome but yesterday’s photograph demonstrated that sometimes, by taking away the colour, we are forced to look beyond to shape, form, textures, tone and another layer of beauty is revealed.  The same must be true of black and white landscape photographs.

I didn’t have the chance to get out with the film camera today and put this knowledge into practice so I’ve had a look in the archives and I’ve found a few pictures where I think that absence of colour, rather than taking something away from the photograph, brings something new to it.

Helman Tor24mm f/16 1/25 sec. ISO-100

Today I’m going to invite John Todaro to take up the 5 day black and white photography challenge.  John’s photographs from Long Island, New York are incredibly beautiful and if you haven’t visited John’s blog, I heartily recommend it.  There is of course no obligation to take up the challenge, it’s a bit of fun if time allows.spaceAdrian Theze logo  space


5 Day Black and White Challenge Day 2 – Daffodils

For my 2nd picture in the 5 day black and white challenge, I’m posting an image once more taken on Pan F Plus 50 film.  This photograph, very different to yesterday’s, was taken with my Mamiya 645 Pro Medium Format film camera.

The picture sums up, for me, what is so special about film photography.  It’s all about the grain in the image. Digital ‘noise’ is so very different.  The grain is not so evident at this resolution but looking at the image full size, the grain gives a really lovely texture and a quality to the image that, although it can be mimicked in digital, it can’t be matched.  As I’ve said before, I’m not about to sell my Nikon D800 and film is hard work by comparison to digital photography, but I’m finding working with film very satisfying.

I’ve used a very fine grain film, Pan F 50 Plus, for this image.  Pan F however, is known for being quite contrasty, see yesterday’s image, with very rich blacks. To counteract the tendency for heavy contrast, with this photograph I set the ASA to 25 rather that 50 on my light meter (leading to slight over-exposure) and pulled the processing, that is, I stopped development before the standard time for the Ilford Ilfosol 3 developer that I was using..

Daffodils80mm f/4 1/30 sec. ASA 25

Today I’m going to invite Tina of Travels and Trifles to take up the 5 day Black and White Challenge.  Tina is of course known for her beautiful (colour) travel photography but there have been some gorgeous black and white images along the way.  This is all a bit of fun and there is of course no pressure to take part but I’m seeing some beautiful black and white photography as a result of the challenge and that’s what it’s all about.

spaceAdrian Theze logospace

 


5 Day Black and White Challenge

I’m grateful to Sue J of Words Visual who yesterday invited me to join in the 5 day black and white challenge.  As I’m currently exploring black and white film photography using vintage cameras and developing my own black and white negatives, I was happy to take up the challenge and join in.

I immediately thought of Roche Rock as the perfect subject for my first photograph so here it is, Roche Rock photographed using my 1930’s Agfa Billy record.

As some of you may remember, this little camera was a gift from a very good friend and fellow blogger Angi (Moments in Time).  Angi came to Cornwall to take part in one of my workshops last year.  The camera was a lovely gift and was the catalyst for my new-found interest in black and white film photography.  We visited Roche Rock one afternoon as part of the workshop and I’ve been wanting to get back to take some pictures using the Agfa Billy ever since.  The challenge was the perfect opportunity.  This is a simple camera, the point and shoot of its day. It’s over 80 years old, produces a huge medium format negative and the quality from the little 3 element lens is amazing, I think you’ll agree..

Roche Rock

F/11 1/125 sec. ASA/ISO 50

This negative was developed in Ilford ID11 stock 1+3 at 20°C for 15 minutes.

It is the nature of these challenges that we pass it on so today I’m going to invite Angi to take up the challenge but of course there is no pressure to take part, only if time allows..

spaceAdrian Theze logospace

 

 

 

 


The Jubilee Pool, Penzance

Just before Christmas I visited the Jubilee Pool in Penzance and was really taken with the beautiful Art Deco design of the pool.  I was aware that funding had been found to restore the pool to its former glory following the devastating storms at the beginning of last year. The pool was opened in 1935 to mark the Silver Jubilee of King George V. Today, it is one of the few remaining 1930s lidos in the entire country.

I was very interested in the future of the pool so I contacted the Mayor of Penzance and asked if I might be given access to take pictures of the pool, as it is now, before the restoration work begins.

I was put in touch with a chap called James Hardy, Community Network Coordinator, who is overseeing and coordinating the work for Cornwall Council.  I told James what I wanted to do, to capture the pool as it is now and to follow the work as it progresses over the next 12 months or so.  The plan is that the pool will re-open in May 2016.

My request was discussed at a meeting two weeks ago with the contractors who are carrying out the work and the Friends of the Jubilee Pool who are busy raising money to match funding from central government.  I’m really pleased to say that I have been taken on as photographer for the entire project and I will be now be a regular visitor to the pool, cataloguing the work as it proceeds.

I visited the pool on Monday and met Ashley Snell, a geo-technical engineer, who is currently surveying the pool. During the storms of last winter that I mentioned earlier, the force of the sea was such that the pool was lifted and moved from its anchorage on the bedrock beneath.  It’s Ashley’s job to now carry out a survey to assess the full extent of the damage and to gather information on the rock the pool sits on.  On Monday, drilling equipment was craned in and the process of drilling bore holes at different points around the pool has begun.

Monday was a beautiful day with bright sunshine presenting a few challenges photographically, but also opportunities.  I’ve a lot of pictures to go through and will be posting a gallery of those images soon but in the meantime, here are a few of the images I’ve processed so far.  In the bright sunshine, looking at the pool, one could be forgiven for thinking just a lick of paint here and there would put things right.  However, the reality can be seen in the third photograph, the pool has buckled and twisted under the force of the sea, almost as if an earthquake had struck..

Jubilee Pool24mm f/11 1/200 sec. ISO-100

spaceJubileed Pool 270mm f/8 1/200 sec. ISO-100

spaceDamage to the Jubilee Pool in Penzance24mm f/13 1/160 sec. ISO-100

spaceAdrian Theze logo

 


Agfa Billy Record 7.7

Agfa Billy Record 7.7

When fellow blogger and good friend Angi came to Cornwall to take part in one of my photo workshops, to my surprise, she had a gift for me.  The gift was an Agfa Billy Record 7.7 camera.  These cameras were produced between 1933 and 1942 so my new camera could be anything from 73 to 82 years old.  Given the war, I guess it’s more likely to be pre 1939.  It’s a real beauty.  The proviso that went with the gift was that I take some pictures with it.  I started by taking pictures of it with my point and shoot. See below.. :-)

The first film I put through the camera before Christmas gave me a few problems and I wasted the film but over the Christmas holidays, I got to thinking about film photography.  The gift had reminded me of my early teenage interest in photography when everything was analougue.  I can remember spending hours learning to wind a film onto a Paterson developing tank spool that my Dad had given me to practise with.  I never got around to actually following through, winding on a real film and developing it, so I set about ordering all I would need to develop the first roll of film from the Billy Record myself.

In for a penny, in for a pound, whilst shopping on ebay for used darkroom equipment I came across a listing for a Mamiya 645 pro medium format camera.  Having used the digital version last year (which costs around £30,000) the film version, for a few hundred pounds imported from Japan, seemed like a bargain not to be missed.  A new skill for a new year!

Agfa Billy Record 7.7spaceToday, I got around to developing the first film taken with the camera.  This was only the second time I’d developed a film (I’d already developed a test roll from the Mamiya) so I’ve been very pleased with the results on all counts.

The negatives are huge – 8.5 x 5.5 cm.  If you can imagine film to be the analogue equivalent of a digital sensor, this would be a very large sensor indeed.  The sensor in my Nikon D800 full frame digital camera is just 3.6 x 2.4 cm.  There are 36.8 million pixels packed into that sensor yielding amazing quality.  I’m sure the grains of silver halide on the film are larger than a pixel but the point I’m trying to get across is that this little camera has the potential for some fine quality prints.  The Agfa Billy is basically a medium format point and shoot.

The camera has two distance settings, 2m to 5m and 5m to infinity, three shutter speeds and three aperture settings.  The lens is simple, just three elements.  One thing it doesn’t have is an auto film advance.  So when a digital photographer like myself gets hold of a camera like this, the inevitable happens when said digital photographer forgets to wind on the film before taking the next shot, yielding a higher than acceptable number of double exposures. Still, these are the first pictures from this 80 year old camera, taken around my garden and I’m delighted with the results. Click on any of the images below to open a gallery.

 

By the way, just one more week to go in the DLR ‘Blowing in the Wind’ Photo competition! Submit a photo or three and you could win Topaz Labs’ Complete Collection.  Must be worth a peek in the archives and an email with some attachments! We look forward to seeing your entries! Click Here for more details

 

 


The First Post of Many More I Hope..

My thoughts and deepest sympathy go to the families of those who lost their lives in the latest terrorist atrocity in Paris.  As mature, liberal democracies in the West, we stand, for the most part, for freedom and tolerance.  People may face discrimination but they do not live in fear because of what they believe, what they might say, or who they are.  If we lose sight of this tolerance, the terrorists win.  I don’t know the answers, I just try to focus on the beauty I find all around me and wonder why…

Happy Birthday Cornwall Photographic

I used a title very similar to the title of this blog 3 years ago today when I wrote my first ever blog post.  I did so at the suggestion and encouragement of a good friend and fellow blogger Marina.  As it’s turned out, my hopes expressed in that first post have been realised. I have now written 377 posts and counting.  I never imagined for one moment when I started this blog that anyone would actually look at it, but on one day alone last year I had 1,481 views, over 105,000 views in total now.

I bought myself a DSLR camera for Christmas 2012, the blog came along in the new year as a place I could post the pictures I had started to take. Up until this point, I’d taken nothing but snaps at family gatherings and on annual holidays with a basic point and shoot. I’d been interested in photography in my early teens.  My parents gave me a Zenit SLR.  No auto settings of course and I learned the principles of exposure using a hand-held light meter.  But, my initial interest in photography gave way to bikes and cars and the usual stuff. Determined to find something I could do despite my illness, I’d decided to take up photography again, reigniting that early interest. Both the photography and the blog have been a godsend.

I knew that I was embarking on a journey with my new DSLR hence the blog’s title. I didn’t realise at that time however, what an amazing journey it would be.

I’ve posted a lot of pictures in the last three years. Some I’m very proud of, more than a few not so much to say the least but good, bad or indifferent, they are all an important part of the story and the journey.

This last year has been incredible. From my first tentative steps with a DSLR three years ago, I’ve been shortlisted in a couple of major international photography competitions.  I became a Licentiate and then an Associate of the Royal Photographic Society.  I’ve been published in magazines, the latest being the February edition of Classic Boat, my images have been used in national and global advertising campaigns and one of my photographs has just been selected to join 99 others (chosen from more than 3.500 entries) to tour the country in a Royal Photographic Society Exhibition this year.  I’m really not sure any of this would have happened without the support and encouragement of the WordPress blogging community.  Having somewhere I could share what I was trying to do and to get such positive feedback, I have no doubt is what’s kept me moving forward.

I’ve made some very good friends here in the last three years and hope to make many more in the coming years. I would like to thank everyone who has looked at, followed and commented on my blog.  This is, as I’ve said, a wonderful community of supportive, encouraging people. I’m now looking forward to many more posts as the journey continues..

These are a few of my favourite photographs from the past 3 years, some because I like the pictures, others for their associations.  This is the beauty of photography, we capture a moment and we have it to hold for ever..

Click on any of the images for a sharper, clearer view.  This will open a slide show :-)

spaceAdrian Theze logospace


Shortlisted..

I’ve just heard that two of my photographs have been shortlisted in the Outdoor Photographer of the Year competition.  The shortlist hasn’t been made public yet so I can’t post the images here but I did post one of them just a little while ago along with a few others, wondering which one you all preferred.  Category winners (I’ve been shortlisted in the ‘Light on the Land’ category) will be announced on Wednesday 14th January and the overall winner will be announced at Telegraph Outdoor Adventure & Travel Show at London’s ExCel on the 15th February.  Looking at the shortlist and recognising the names of some of the top landscape photographers in the country, I’m really quite stunned and more than a little bit chuffed right now.. :-)

It’s been a pretty amazing day all round actually.  I was assessed by a physio today for Functional Electronic Stimulation (FES) treatment.  Basically my nerves are scrambled due to my MS and this has led to walking difficulties generally but one problem in particular,  has been an inability to raise my right foot.  The signals have not been getting through from my brain, and this has led to my foot dragging when it should be lifting when I take a stride.  This has led to trips and stumbles and a very sore back due to trying to compensate by swinging my leg around rather than through.

The FES treatment involves wearing a couple of electrodes just below the knee attached to a pressure sensitive pad in your shoe.  When you raise your leg to walk, the pressure pad is activated and a signal is sent to the electrodes which then deliver and electronic stimulus to the nerve, that should be being stimulated by my brain, through the skin.  The result is a raised foot, no more dragging.  I have two more appointments now with the physio to teach me how to use the equipment.  Pretty amazing all round as I said! :-)

The Minnack Theatre and Porthcurno Beach..

But to business,  Just before Christmas I visited the Minnack theatre in Cornwall.  It was somewhere I’d wanted to visit for a long time and after a week of some of the dullest and miserable weather Cornwall has to offer, the sun came out.  The Minnack theatre was the brainchild of Rowena Cade (2 August 1893 – 1983), older sister of the feminist Katharine Burdekin, who moved to Cornwall after the First World War and built a house for herself and her mother on land at Minack Point for £100. In 1929, a local village group of players had staged Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a nearby meadow at Crean, repeating the production the next year. They decided that their next production would be The Tempest and Miss Cade offered the garden of her house as a suitable location, as it was beside the sea.

A photograph of the Minnack Theatre Cornwall14mm f/11 1/125 sec. ISO-100

Miss Cade and her gardener made a terrace and rough seating, hauling materials down from the house or up via the winding path from the beach below. In 1932, The Tempest was performed with the sea as a dramatic backdrop, to great success. Miss Cade resolved to improve the theatre, working over the course of the winter months each year throughout her life (with the help of Billy Rawlings and Charles Angove) so that others might perform each summer.

In 1944, the theatre was used as a location for the Gainsborough Studios film Love Story, starring Stewart Granger and Margaret Lockwood but inclement weather forced them to retreat to a studio mock-up. In 1955, the first dressing rooms were built. In the 1970s, the theatre was managed by Lawrence Shove. Since 1976 the theatre has been registered as a Charitable Trust and is now run by a local management team. Rowena Cade died on 26 March 1983, at the age of 89.

Minnack Theatre Stage14mm f/11 1/25 sec. ISO-100

Nowadays, the theatre is used from June to September for a full summer season of 17 plays, produced by companies from all over the UK and visiting companies from the USA. The theatre is open for visitors throughout the rest of the year. The 75th anniversary of Minack was celebrated with a production of The Tempest in August 2007, directed by Simon Taylor and performed by the Winchester College Players. Source: Wiki

Once of the beauties of a visit to the Minnack Theatre is that right next door,  you’ll find Porthcurno.  Sadly the sun wasn’t shining when we visited the beach but it’s definitely one of the most beautiful in Cornwall. Imagine a nice warm sunny day, that gorgeous azure blue water, lovely golden sands..  Given that this was taken in December in the UK, it looks pretty good to me. :-)

Porthcurno14mm f/11 1/40 sec. ISO-100

Click on any of the images for a sharper view.. :-)

space

 


The Jubilee Pool, Penzance

Jubilee Pool, Penzance

The Jubilee Pool, pictured below, was opened in 1935 to mark the Silver Jubilee of King George V. Today, it is one of the few remaining 1930s lidos in the entire country.  Measuring 100 x 73 metres on its longest axes, the Jubilee Pool is Britain’s largest surviving open air lido.  However, the severe storms in February this year caused major structural damage to the pool and it didn’t open for the 2014 season.

Looking at the pool under leaden December skies, it’s clear the lido is in need of some fairly major maintenance all round.  The good news is that Penzance Town Council and the Friend’s of Jubilee Pool, jointly bid for £2 million government funding this year and the bid was successful.  I’m not sure when work is due to begin but I’m so glad that this wonderful Art Deco pool with its sweeping curves will survive. It was definitely built for hardier souls than me however.  It’d have to be an exceptionally warm day for me to venture into a lido like this one.

The pool is 80 next year and this funding ensures it’s going to be a  very good year for the Jubilee pool.  I hope it’s an equally good new year for you.  Happy New Year! :-)

Jubilee Pool, Penzance14mm f/11 1/80 sec ISO-100

spaceJubilee Pool, Penzance, detail14mm f/11 1/80 sec. ISO-100

spaceJubilee Pool Penzance14mm f/11 1/80 sec. ISO-100

spaceJubilee Pool, Penzance14mm f/11 1/80 sec ISO-100

Happy New Year!

space


Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

This photograph was taken in Mousehole a few days ago.  Each year the people of this tiny fishing village in the west of Cornwall decorate the harbour to raise money for charity. Mulled wine was on offer along with mince pies and the opportunity to drop some coins in a bucket.  When I visited, a group of carol singers were doing their best despite the weather.  It was raining, the wind was howling but the atmosphere in the village was a festive and happy one.

The blurred object in the bottom right of the picture is a whale spouting, outlined in lights, but the wind and fairly loose tethering were conspiring against a decent capture over a long exposure.

I’d like to thank everyone who has followed, commented and supported this blog over the last year.  It’s been a pretty amazing 12 months for me and it wouldn’t have been the same without your company.  Thanks for being there.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and a very happy new year.. See you in 2015! :-)

Mousehole Harbour Christmas Lights14mm f/11 120 sec. ISO-100

 


Beware the Amazon Gift Card Upload..

This photograph was taken just outside Geysir, in Iceland.  I’m not sure if the town gives its name to the jets of hot water and steam that burst forth from the ground at regular intervals or not.  Needless to say such things are to be found here.  This was one of those places we didn’t beat the tour buses to so were happy to drive through and enjoy the steaming streams and plumes of steam rising from various point in the ground from afar..

Landscape photograph, Geysir, Iceland Sunset, Iceland70mm ff/11 1/80 sec. ISO-100

The main point of this post is to highlight an issue I came across this afternoon that I felt really needed to be shared.  It’s Christmas time and our thoughts turn to relatives that we may or may not be seeing over the Christmas period.  Perhaps a gift card is the answer to your gift buying nightmare.  Faced with this dilemma we might then turn to a company like Amazon and note that they kindly provide us with the option to upload an image from our computers to decorate the gift card we intend to send.

This was the case I faced this afternoon. I uploaded my image and as with all things, I had to agree to Amazon’s terms and conditions.  Having a good idea about the way these corporations operate now I thought I better read said terms and conditions before I agreed to them.  I was extremely disappointed but not at all surprised really to see that by uploading an image to Amazon you

hereby grant to Amazon, its Affiliates and sublicencees a worldwide, nonexclusive, royalty-free, perpetual, right and licence to (a) reproduce, distribute, transmit, publicly perform and publicly display the Materials, in whole or in part, in any manner and Media, (b) modify, adapt, translate and create derivative works from the Materials, in whole or in part, in any manner and Media, and (c) sublicense the foregoing rights, in whole or in part, to any third party, with or without a fee.

and

grant to Amazon, its Affiliates and sublicencees a worldwide, nonexclusive, royalty-free, perpetual, right and licence to use all trademarks, trade names, and the names and likenesses of any individuals that appear in the Materials.

Always worth checking the small print.  I’ll certainly not be uploading any of my photographs.  Why would Amazon assume to take ownership?  Because they can is the answer I guess. I’ll leave you to draw your own conclusions.  I’ve heard a lot about Amazon lately that makes me less and less inclined to warm to them as a business, not least their very successful tax avoidance strategies and the way they treat their staff.  It seems they’re not above ripping off their customer’s artwork either.

 

 

 

 


The Seaman’s Mission Project – Salt of the Earth

I was very honoured to be invited, along with my camera, to the launch of a new book that has been created by David and Jan Penprase to raise money for the Mission to Seafarers in in Newlyn, Cornwall.  The book contains photographs and biographies of the fishermen and people associated with the fishing industry in this tight-knit fishing community.  All proceeds from the book will go to the Fishermen’s Mission which does invaluable work. No matter what problem a seafarer might be facing, be it injury, abandonment, non-payment of wages or personal difficulties, they know they can turn to the local Mission for help, advice and support.

David Penprase works exclusively in black and white film and the book is a superb collection of his work with the fishermen of Newlyn and their families, some of whom I had the pleasure of meeting last friday night.  More information about the book can be found here

The book is a 160 page heavy weight A4 publication which retails at £20, all of which goes directly to the Fishermen’s Mission.  Fishing is a tough and dangerous business.  The storms of last winter really took their toll with fisherman unable to get out to sea.

I have a copy of the book and I’m not at all surprised that within hours of the book’s launch, it had made over £7000.  It’s a fascinating insight into the lives of the people of Newlyn and will be a resource for generations to come.  I would recommend this book to anyone especially given the good work the proceeds of the book will do.  The photographs are a lesson in how to take and print portraits from one of the best in the world.  It can be purchased through eBay here

This gallery is a small collection of the photographs I took at the book launch.  Click on any image to start the slide show.

 

 

I’m going to be away for the next couple of weeks, visiting a country I have always wanted to go to and which is, coincidentally enough, ;-), a bit of a landscape photographers dream location..  I’m very excited to be going and looking forward to immersing myself in the landscape and focusing 100% on photography and creativity for creativity’s sake, no agenda, just pictures.  With my business, Royal Photographic Society distinctions and all sorts of other projects in the last year, it feels like it’s been a while – just me, my camera and the landscape I’m in. Can’t wait.. :-)

Talking of the Royal Photographic Society, I’m rather chuffed, tootling my own trumpet here, that my Licentiate Distinction Panel is featured in a new information pamphlet produced by the Royal Photographic Society about the distinctions process, distinctions that are recognised the world over as marks of excellence in photography.  click on the link to download or view the leaflet to learn more about gaining an RPS Distinction. Marketing leaflet 2015

See you all when I’m back in a couple of weeks.  I’ll still be dipping into your blogs when I can but WiFi will be limited.

 


Trebarwith Strand

Trebarwith Strand sits on the north coast of Cornwall not far from Tintagel.  The rock structures are a superb subject for photographers.  At high tide, the waves start washing up two channels created by the action of the waves while a seam of much harder rock forms a spine down the middle.  The result makes for some interesting pictures and on more than one occasion, including this one, wet feet. Click on the image for a clearer sharper view.. ;-)

Trebarwith Strand24mm f/11 53 sec. ISO-100

This picture was taken using the Lee Big Stopper filter.

Digimarc Logo Long


Lerryn

Lerryn is a beautiful little village that sits on the River Lerryn, a tributary of the River Fowey.  I was passing through one morning having been up all night photographing the Milky Way.  I was tired but as I crossed the little bridge and saw the misty calm on the river, I had to turn around and get my camera set up once more.  Click on the image for a clearer sharper view.. :-)

Lerryn38mm f/11 1/100 sec. ISO-100

spaceCornwall Photographic Sales Logo

dfi-dmrc-enabled-btn-white3