Posts tagged “Seascape

WordPress Birthday

Blizzard at Reynisfjara

Hello,  It’s now 4 years since I started writing this blog.  When I picked up the camera again after many years of absence I was encouraged by a friend, Marina Chetna, to start getting my photography out there and that is what I did.  I created a WordPress account.

The response to the work I have posted over the last four years has been humbling, the encouragement from fellow bloggers incredible.  I’ve come a long way.  I don’t want to turn this into a boast post, that’s not what I’m about but I’ve just been invited to write for Outdoor Photography, a leading landscape photography magazine in the UK, I have a piece that will be published in the March edition.  That has been rather special, along with the invitation to submit a book proposal, the Icelandic landscape in Winter.  Like I say, I’ve come a long way from taking a few landscape photographs when I could get out, in and around Cornwall to traveling overseas to places I wouldn’t have dreamed of visiting.  None of this would have been possible without the support of all of you.

I’m not a confident person.  I never have been.  The continued support and encouragement, the comments, the very real friendship and appreciation from those enjoying my photography has allowed me to peek my head above a parapet I might never have dared to even approach and the results have been incredible.  Thank you so much for that.

I thought very hard about the picture I might post.  There have quite a few over the last four years but for me, the photograph below came out on top.  My love of Iceland is known to many of you.  This country in winter is incredible.  It’s hard, it’s difficult but if you persevere as a photographer, the rewards are amazing.

This photograph was taken after traveling several miles from Vik in the most horrendous driving conditions possible.  The snow ploughs were working at full stretch.  Turning off the main Route One, we followed a road that had snow drifts so deep we were not at all sure we’d get through.  We did.

Setting up on the beach I thought this is absolutely crazy, the snow was falling so heavily, visibility was nil but then, just for an instant, the snow cleared and I could see exactly why I was there.  Capturing this scene with that single bird putting in an appearance was an absolute gift.  Sometimes it happens, sometimes it doesn’t.  This was an occasion when it most certainly did.

Blizzard at Reynisfjara

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2


When the sun doesn’t shine..

On my recent visit to Fuerteventura, out of the 23 days we were there, we had two really quite stormy days and rather than spend my time, as so many visitors appeared to be doing, wandering around shopping malls looking thoroughly miserable, of course for me as a photographer, this was an opportunity.  I grabbed my camera and headed off into the mountains but not before catching one last photo of the sunshine on the beach before the clouds finally took over completely.

If you look closely, down in the bottom left, you can just see a tiny red flag on the beach indicating it was no longer safe to swim on what is normally a very safe beach indeed. Stormy weather indeed!

Playa de Sotovento65mm f/11 1/250 sec. ISO-100

dsc0829670mm f/8 1/100 sec. ISO-100

dsc0893040mm f/8 1/100 sec. ISO-100

dsc0893630mm f/8 1/100 sec. ISO 100

dsc0893870mm f/8 1/100 sec. ISO-100

Such a wonderful backdrop to this tiny village in the heartland of Fuerteventura.  This extinct volcano, its caldera so clearly defined

dsc0894228mm f/8 1/100 sec. ISO-100

What was wonderful to see after the rain, just a couple of days remember, was the scrub and even the sand come alive with green plants and fresh green shoots.  It was as if spring had arrived in the island though of course it was autumn.

Fuerteventura is a wonderful place to visit and I can recommend it to anyone.  For me, in the off season, this is the very best time to visit even though you can’t be guaranteed that every day will be clear blue skies, that’s perfect for me and my camera.

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2


I’m back..

And as you can imagine, missing Fuerteventura very much.  I’ve attached a few pictures.  This was my home for the last three and a half weeks, the squat white apartment bulding up in the dunes on the far left.  There were 4 apartments in this building, all with terraces and fine views. Leaving Fuerteventura Airport with the temperatures hitting 27°C, arriving at Bristol Airport to temperatures of -3°, the shock to the system was considerable.

Staying on the Playa de Sotovento de Jandia at Risco el Passo, has been a real pleasure.  This beach stretches for miles and miles and has to be one of the top beaches in the world.  It is relatively sheltered here from the strong winds that tend to blow in the Canary Islands, however a very refreshing breeze is the norm keeping the temperatures for me off-season, quite bearable.

But, I’m back now and lots to get on with not least catching up with all of you which I’ll be doing in the coming days.  Thank you for your patience.  I didn’t think I could manage a day without the Internet let alone 3 weeks and more but it’s been a very refreshing change and one I can recommend every now and then.  That said, coming home to nearly 1000 emails in my inbox means there’s a fair amount of catching up to do.

I didn’t do a whole lot of photography, I was needing a bit of a break for reasons I’m hopefully going to be sharing with you all very soon.  However, when we had a couple of stormy days, I couldn’t resist getting up into the mountains with my camera! Those pictures will follow.. :-)

Sotovento BeachPlaya de Sotovento de Jandia, Fuerteventura

Sotovento BeachPlaya de Sotovento de Jandia, Fuerteventura looking South

driftwoodDriftwoodriddle-of-the-sandsRiddle of the Sands

sunrise-from-casa-de-redondaSunrise from Casa de Redonda (The Round House)

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2

 

 


Any day at the beach is a good day..

Saunton Sands - Adrian Theze

Whilst I was visiting Bude recently, I had to deliver some pictures that are being featured in an exhibition in Taunton, Somerset.  This journey took me from north Cornwall to south Devon, on into somerset and rather than return the same way I’d come, I decided to drive north to the north Devon Coast.

In 1976, here in the UK, we had the most extraordinary summer.  Weeks of Mediterranean type weather.  I was lucky enough, as an 11 year old boy, to spend that summer staying with a great uncle in North Devon.  Everyday we visited the beach.  Saunton Sands was the destination of choice and this was somewhere I really wanted to revisit.

Unfortunately, the weather was certainly not that of the summer of ’76 however, it was great to see people enjoying the beach regardless.

Saunton Sands - Adrian Theze24mm f/11 1/250 sec. ISO 100

 Saunton Sands - Adrian Theze70mm f/11 1/250 sec. ISO-100

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2


Bude and the North Cornish/Devon Coast..

I have just returned from a week of much needed R&R staying in a lovely barn conversion just outside Bude in North Cornwall with my good friends Poppy and AJ.  Poppy is now blogging again with a shiny new photography and art blog so if you haven’t checked it out yet, follow this link.

The north Cornish and Devon coast is rugged, the surf fantastic and as ever for me, a pleasure to visit.  One particular feature of Bude is that it has a sea pool.  The pools were constructed in the 20’s and 30’s for people to be able to enjoy a swim in the sea, without having to swim in the sea.  A safe environment without the waves and treacherous currents so much a feature of many Cornish beaches and coves.  These pools cropped up all over the country but few now remain.  The Bude Sea Pool has been restored with donations and fundraising and for both Poppy and myself, a sure fire subject for a photograph or two.  The pool is replenished with fresh sea water at every high tide and it was high tide that was bound to elicit the best pictures.

With spring tides in the offing and occuring very accommodatingly at around 10 in the morning, on one of the few sunnier days, we were there, tripods at the ready.  Surfers often use the pool to launch themselves into the water, timing the moment with great precision.  I was able to capture one such surfer, contemplating and timing the waves.  This picture forms part of the series below.  I hope you enjoy them.. :-)

bude-sea-pool-878870mm f/11 15 sec. ISO100

bude-sea-pool-880134mm f/11 15 sec. ISO-100

bude-sea-pool-896724mm f/4 0.8 sec. ISO-100

bude-sea-pool-895724mm f/4 0.8 sec. ISO-100

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2

 


Sometimes you just get lucky..

Penarth Pier - Adrian Theze

A trip to the passport office in Newport, Gwent, South Wales doesn’t on the surface appear to be the most likely of chores to illicit a photograph but one just never knows.  With a 4 hour wait between handing in the application and picking up the finished passport, a trip along the coast to Penarth, just the other side of Cardiff seemed like a nice distraction.

Arriving at the pier and parking the car, it was immediately clear that there was something really quite special about the early autumn light.  A thin layer of high cloud was obscuring the sun that promised an unseasonably warm Indian summer’s day.

Crossing the road and claiming a bench, a group of swans put in an appearance and the following pictures were the result of a very pleasant hour spent by the sea.  Shooting into the partially obscured sun, the effect was quite magical.

The moral of the story, always, always always take your camera with you.  Even if you’re just making a trip to the supermarket.  You just never know.  You might just get lucky.  I hope you enjoy the photographs.. :-)

Penarth Pier - Adrian Theze33mm f/11 1/320 sec. ISO-100

Penarth Pier - Adrian Theze24mm f/11 1/1250 sec. ISO-100

The Bristol Channel70mm f/11 1/1250 sec. ISO-100

The Bristol Channel70mm f/11 1/1000 sec. ISO-100

Bristol Channel70mm f/11 1/1000 sec. ISO-100

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2


Cromer Pier

Cromer Pier by Adrian Theze

Cromer is a small seaside town on the North Norfolk coast.  I visited Cromer whilst staying with fellow bloggers Hanne and Klausbernd in Cley next the Sea.  Cromer is very popular with families looking for a stay at home, good old fashioned seaside holiday.

There are records of a pier at Cromer dating back to 1391 although then it was more of a jetty. In 1582 Queen Elizabeth I granted rights to the inhabitants of Cromer to export wheat, Barley and Malt with the proceeds to go toward the maintenance and well being of the Pier and the new town of Cromer. In 1822 a 210ft pier was built of cast iron but this structure only lasted 24 years before it was destroyed in a storm.  The current pier at Cromer was completed in 1902 and opened to the public.  Today the pier has a theatre, bars and restaurants and is a popular place for an old fashioned promenade.

Cromer Pier by Adrian ThezeLee Big Stoper, 24mm f/22 45 sec. ISO-100

SpacerDSC_8616Aframe14mm f/11 1/400 sec. ISO-100

SpacerCromer Beach by Adrian Theze24mm f/11 1/640 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerSpacer


North Norfolk

Cley next the sea by Adrian Theze

I have just had the tremendous pleasure of meeting and staying with a couple of blogging friends in Cley next the Sea in North Norfolk.  Many of you will know Hanne and Klausbernd from their blog, The World According to Dina. We’ve had a fabulous week of hospitality, photography and great conversations over some lovely meals in this very beautiful area of the country.

North Norfolk is somewhere I visited as a teenager and haven’t been back since.  I’m so glad to have had the chance to visit now.  I’ll be posting a little bit from Norfolk over the next couple of weeks but for now, here’s a taster.  I’d like to say a huge thank you to Dina and Klausbernd and to encourage other bloggers to meet when they can.  For me it’s always been such a positive and rewarding experience and this was no exception.  I will now be catching up with all your blogs over the next week so bear with me.. :-)

Cley next the sea by Adrian Theze15mm F/11 1/250 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer


Snow and Ice

This picture was taken as a blizzard blew in from the sea on the south coast of Iceland backed by gale force winds.  Within minutes of taking this picture we experienced white out conditions and were very grateful for the yellow markers every few meters along the road that let you know you’re still on it.

The wild, raw nature of the winter in Iceland always makes me want to go back.  When you’re alone in this wilderness you cannot help but feel alive and connected in a way I’ve certainly never experienced anywhere else.  It sounds crazy to some perhaps but when I’m battling the wind, trying to keep my tripod from toppling over let alone steady, trying to keep my lens clear of snow and some kind of circulation in my fingers as the sub-zero temperatures and wicked wind chill get to work on them, I’m really never happier.

snow-and-ice

52mm f/11 1/80 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerSpacer


Ice and Snow

Frozen lake, Iceland by Adrian Theze

I imagine this is what Europa, Jupiter’s smallest moon, must be like – a keen contender in the search for extra-terrestial life.  This picture however was taken in Iceland in February.  The stark, raw, wild beauty of it touches me deeply..

Hofn, Iceland by Adrian Theze40mm f/11 1./60 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer

 


Book Covers..

It’s always nice when your work is recognised and I’m really pleased that one of my photos has been chosen for the cover of The Malice of the Waves, a thriller by Mark Douglas-Home which is to be published on the 19th of May by Penguin.  My photograph is featured on the hardback edition.

Here’s the book cover..

Malice of the Waves

Copyright Adrian Theze and Arcangel images

 

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer


On the beach from Dawn until Dusk..

A Postcard or two from Fuerteventura

Regular followers of this blog will know that I love the sea, I love the coast and I love the beach.  Whether visiting the beaches around the coast of my home county of Cornwall, the black volcanic snow and ice covered beaches of Iceland or the sun drenched beaches of the Canaries, I’m a happy man.

Here a few picture postcard beach shots from my recent visit to Fuerteventura, I hope you enjoy them..

DSC07027 frSpacerDSC07331 frSpacer20160303_143115frSpacerDSC07332frSpacer

SpacerDSC07332A frSpacerDSC07379 frSpacerDSC07496 frSpacerDSC07507 frSpacerDSC07521 frSpacerDSC07488 frSpacerDSC07007 frSpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerSpacer


Hvalnes

Hvaines by Adrian Theze

Höfn is my spiritual home.  Some of my best friends are here.  I have been welcomed into homes and into the community and treated with the most incredible hospitality here and when I became ill here a couple of weeks ago, I was treated with care and compassion to the point that phone calls were made way beyond the call of duty to check how I was doing.  Yes, Höfn is where my heart is.

Hofn by Adrian Theze48mm f/11 1/320 sec. ISO-100

Besides the wonderful people and the incredible health and dental care, the scenery is just incredible and a short ride along route 1 and through the tunnel that takes you through a range of mountains you will come to Hvalnes.  If you’re from Höfn, which as I’ve mentioned before is pronounced h’up (the h is very breathy) you’ll pronounce Hvalnes with a sort of clearing of the throat k followed by va-ll-n-yes.

Icelandic is not easy but Iceland sure is easy on the eye.

Hvaines by Adrian Theze24mm f/11 1/125 sec. ISO-100

Whilst being blasted once again by winds gusting up to 70 mph that were literally pushing our car sideways on the Ice which when you’re driving along the highway is extremely unsettling, I managed to stop the car every now and then and take pictures that engender such incredible serenity in me but they really do belie the conditions.  Taking them, well, that was a real battle on this occasion.

Hvaines by Adrian Theze

24mm f/11 1/125 sec. ISO-100

The reindeer in the picture below were not at all bothered by the weather, settling down on top of the black sand spit, that separates the ocean from the frozen fresh water lake, to ensure they benefitted from the very best of the wind and its numbing windchill.  The ambient temperature was around – 12 °C making this feel more like, I’m reliably informed, -50 °C.  This was not the weather you’d want to spend too much time out of the car taking photographs.  Thankfully, having visited the location many times, I knew where I wanted to be and I got my pictures on this rather wild Sunday afternoon but they really were hard-won on this occasion! Nevertheless, I enjoyed taking these photographs and I very much hope that you enjoy viewing them. :-)

DSC_5471A70mm f/11 1/125 sec. ISO-100

Spacer

DSC_5436A14mm f/11 1/125 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer
This post is dedicated to Svanhildur, a friend I got to know for all too short a time.  I will think of you always when I think of Höfn.  Rest in peace now..Spacer


Dorset and the Jurassic Coast..

Portland Bill, Dorset, Adrian Theze

I’m really enjoying a break before Christmas in Dorset, only a couple of counties east of Cornwall but so very different.  I’m here with Poppy, her BB with Lottie the white German Shepherd.  It’s great to be exploring a very different coastline.  Dorset is of course famous for it’s Jurassic coast and the numerous fossils that can be found here.

Mary Anning found the first Icthyosaur skeleton at the age of 12 and became quite a celebrity.  Despite having no education, she became quite the expert on fossils.  Fossils were the family business in Lyme Regis, sold as curios to the wealthy middle and upper classes.  Lyme Regis had become a very fashionable holiday location in the late 18th and early 19th Century.   This was, to a large extent a consequence of the French Revolution which had made travel to Europe (the preferred destination for people with a bit of cash prior to this time) a little problematic to say the least.

The fossils found here generated a huge amount of interest not least because at the time, the majority in England still believed in creationism and the discovery of the fossilised skeletons of these strange creatures raised lots of doubts about the age of the Earth (a tad more than 2000 years old clearly) and the origin and nature of life on the planet.

The following pictures were taken despite the very grey and largely wet conditions we’re experiencing here in Dorset but then, it is December.. :-)

The picture below shows the back of the fisherman’s college which forms part of the Cobb, the name for the sea wall at Lyme, made famous by Meryl Streep, standing at the end, waiting for her French lieutenant..

The Cobb, Dorset Adrian ThezeSony A7R 27mm  f/4 1/100 sec. ISO-100

SpacerBeach huts along the front at Swanage..

beach huts at Swannage, Dorset, Adrian ThezeNikon D800 24mm f/11 1/50 sec. ISO-100

Spacer
Durdle Door, an arch in the Portland limestone rock, possibly formed as long ago as 150 million years with the sea surging through..

Durdle Door, Dorset, Adrian ThezeNikon D800 14mm f/11 1/50 sec. ISO-100

SpacerPortland Bill lighthouse, taken on a wild and windy day with large waves and sea spray that did a very good job of soaking me..

Portland Bill, Dorset, Adrian ThezeNikon D800 36mm f/11 1/30 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2

 


Home.. Höfn

A trip to Iceland, wouldn’t be complete without a visit to a place that has really captured my heart, Höfn.  As we were driving down the east coast from Akureyri to Höfn, I found myself asking ‘what time will we be home’.  I have made such good friends here and for a photographer, Höfn and the surrounding area, really takes some beating.

As we approached ‘home’ after a day photographing back along the east coast, the sun was low and preparing to set.  The light was magical.  I knew immediately that just after the tunnel, I would have to turn left and take the gravel road to Stokksnes.  The last time I visited I was with my good friend Ronnie and being with a local, I was spared the 600 kr per person entry fee that Omar, the land owner has imposed on tourists.  I must point out that this is extremely un-Icelandic behaviour and something that local people are horrified by but Omar is known for his love of the Krona so there it is, you pay to continue along the gravel road to this amazing beauty spot.

I paid my 600 kr and continued on my way but quickly became aware of someone in a pick-up truck persuing us.  I pulled over and the truck pulled up.  A man leaned out of the window claimed I hadn’t paid.  This must be Omar I thought.  He’d certainly checked that honesty box smartish.  I did pay I explained, I put the money in your honesty box’.  There’s a box outside the small cafe for you to pay should the cafe be closed.  However what I hadn’t realised was Omar was now charging 600 kr per person and there were two of us in the car.

I handed over the money and asked ‘last time I was here with Ronnie from the village’, someone Omar knows well, ‘he took us to an old fishing boat’.  ‘You want to take more pictures’ Omar asked.  ‘I do’ I replied.  ‘Follow me he said..’  He drove round the gate to the left that had a handmade sign strung across it.  A read circle with a white band across it, ‘No Entry’ had been added at the bottom just in case someone might not have got the message.

We followed Omar around the gate and through a puddle that came half-way up Omars wheels so I was guessing a little higher on my rented Kia Sorento.  Both myself and my passenger looked down to see if we were about to get wet feet.  Not this time thankfully.  On down the track Omar pulled up at the edge of the very shiny black sand.  It was high tide.  Something I only realised when we got to the edge.  I could see the surf crashing not too far out.

‘I’ll leave you here’ Omar said. ‘Keep within 50 metres of the green and you’ll be OK’, the green being the marsh grasses to our left, ‘but don’t stop mind’ at this, Omar made gestures that left us in no doubt that we’d sink if we did.  He reversed, smiling and waving.  Did I detect a certain mischievousness to that smile?  Surely not.

Behind us the sky was an amazing pink, ablaze as the sun was sinking lower.  I took a deep breath, I’m a photographer, I need to get my picture, and drove onto the wet sand.  The 4×4 was managing well, traction was good but the car felt the same way I’ve felt when walking across a very deep pile carpet, it was decidedly spongy.  As I made my way from one raised bit of dry sand to another, I was beginning to think that maybe this time I’d gone too far..  I should have waited for Ronnie except Ronnie was in Paris.  I was beginning to worry a little.  We were driving through porridge.  The spongy, squidginess of the going beneath us seemed to be increasing.  I checked my distance from the ‘green’.  I was about 25m away so apparently safe, nonetheless, I pressed the gass.  Did Omar send us out here only to charge us an exorbitant fee for rescue?  I banished the thought.

Thankfully, off in the distance I could see the track emerging from the sand and I knew we’d soon be on terra firma once more.  I drove on to the small cove where I knew the boat lay.  We made it!  The light was beautiful but we were very aware of the crashing surf.  It really looked as though the tide was still coming in..  Extra porridgey, spongy, squidginess to come.. Hmm.  I didn’t relish the thought.

Below is one of the pictures I took that white knuckle late afternoon.  I didn’t hang about.  I was keen to get back across the sands.  I began to worry that I’d never find that exit track in the gloom and we’d be left searching in the dark for a way off the sand.  I was comforted, sort of, that Omar would still be watching.  He wouldn’t wish us any harm I was sure.  We set off back across the sand, hopping from one small island of higher drier sand to the next.  Searching the horizon for the ‘exit’ I began to enjoy myself, weaving this way and that.

Passing the Viking Village on the right (A film set waiting for a film apparently) I knew it couldn’t be too much further when out of the gloom, I could see what looked like a track.  Sure enough, in no time at all I was off the sand and on our way ‘home’.  It was a big relief.  At no time were we in physical danger I’m sure.  Just in danger of getting stuck on the sand.  Not a welcome thought as it was a lot further than I could manage to walk.

As we passed the cafe there was no sign of Omar’s truck.  We hadn’t seen headlights departing as we approached dry land and we hadn’t passed it as we passed what I think was his house so at what point he’d left we just don’t know.  I must add again, Omar is very much an exception.  The Icelandic people are warm, friendly and extremely eager to help their ‘guests’ get the very most from their stays in Iceland.

Fishing Boat, Hofn, Iceland

14mm f/8 1/15 ISO-100.

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer


The Northern Lights..

On Wednesday night, the Icelandic Met Office Aurora forecast was ‘Severe’.  This was as high as the scale goes and I’d never seen it at anything above ‘Very Active’.  I’m not sure why they should use the word ‘severe’ when talking about the aurora but I guess it must have something to do with the potential for disruption to communications that comes with solar flares.

The weather here in Iceland had been awful all day.  But ever hopeful, after dinner I set off for Grotta Lighthouse in the west of Reykjavik.  As I pulled into the car park and looked up, the clouds parted momentarily to give me a taste of what might be before closing in again.  The rain started and I thought that was it.  My one chance at a really decent show of the Aurora Borealis and the weather was not playing ball.

On a hunch, I left Grotta Lighthouse (to be honest I wasn’t too happy with the level of orange sodium light pollution from the city) and I set of for the most westerly point I could think of that wasn’t too far out from Reykjavik.  The point I had in mind was the small town of Gardur, not far from Keflavik Airport.  I knew there was a lighthouse there as well as a daymark complete with the traditional red stripes.  I figured if I could get beyond the terrible weather, this would make a good foreground subject while I waited to see what a ‘severe’ show of the Northern Lights might reveal.

It rained all the way to Keflavik, it was only as I pulled into Gardur that the rain appeared to be stopping.  I drove through a town all tucked up for the night to the lighthouse and daymark where, not surprisingly, I found several photographers with tripods set and looking skyward hopefully.

I couldn’t get near the daymark for the other photographers so I set up on the beach and waited.  It wasn’t long before the clouds thinned and I could see stars.  Shortly thereafter, I was witness to one of nature’s most mesmerizing light shows.  It started quite gently, just along the beach..

Northern Lights IIISpacerAnd went on from there..Northern Lights VSpacerIt wasn’t long before it started to rain again.  It was about 1am and I was considering heading home as indeed the other photographers appeared to be doing.  I hung back though, once again on a hunch and waited.  The skies cleared shortly thereafter and with the ‘competition’ gone, I could finally set up the shot I’d had in my mind’s eye before arriving in Gardur.

What I hadn’t bargained for was quite how intense the light show turned out to be and I certainly hadn’t imagined being able to capture the aurora and the Milky Way in the same shot but there it was.  I was so glad I hadn’t given up..

Northern Lights II

SpacerNorthern Lights ISpacerNorthern Lights IVSpacerI’ve only just started going through the many photographs I took that night.  These are just a few examples, I’m sure I’ll be posting more along the way.  The skies were not completely clear as you can see but I was quite pleased, the clouds really added something rather than detracted I think.. :-)

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2


The Lonely Man..

I was on the beach at Reynisfjara at the very southern-most tip of Iceland in a blizzard back in February.  I was taking pictures despite the snow when a figure seemed to materialise out of nowhere, way up the beach, walking towards me.  As he came close I saw that he was a fellow photographer.  As he passed we exchanged greetings, surreptitiously checking out each other’s equipment (like you do) while we talked.  Satisfied and content in that camera brand camaraderie one finds amongst Nikon and Canon shooters alike, we said goodbye and he moved off.

A piece of music came unbidden to mind, a lovely piece of music by the great Joe Harnell, The lonely Man.  The piece of music, one I used to play myself, accompanied the closing credits to the Incredible Hulk TV series as David Bannerman, still afflicted by the hulk curse after another adventure, set off once more in his lonely search for a cure.

This is a link to the music if you’re unfamiliar with it.  It was used in the recent Hulk movie too –  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4_5c1OJXc4  It just seemed to just fit the image somehow..  Enjoy!

Reynisfjara Beach, Iceland27mm f/11 1/30 sec. ISO-50

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerMe (2)


Reynisfjara

Reynisfjara, Iceland in winter

Reynisfjara is a black sand beach at the very southern-most tip of Iceland, not far from the village of Vik.  The last time I visited, I’d just travelled through the most intense snow storm that had an army of ploughs struggling to keep the road clear.  As I got onto the beach, there was a moment of respite and I could clearly see the storm continuing its journey up the coast..

Blizzard at Reynisfjara

45mm f/11 1/60 sec. ISO-50

This post is dedicated to all those struggling with the heat of the summer.

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer


Summer..

This is a photograph of the Wheal Coates engine house from the beach at Chapel Porth

We’ve been having some very pleasant sunny days here in Cornwall over the last couple of weeks.  The wind has been cold which has kept the edge off the heat which for me is a positive thing.  MS Symptoms are exacerbated by the heat, perhaps this is why I’m enjoying Iceland so much.  The weather today is warm, muggy, dull and wet, quite a change so I’d thought I’d cheer myself up and process a picture I took of one of my favourite signature view down on Chapel Porth beach the other morning.  The tide was coming in allowing me to capture a nice reflection of the Wheal Coates engine house in the sand. Wet feet were the inevitable side effect but it was worth it I think.  Hopefully the sun will be back with us by Sunday..

This is a photograph of the Wheal Coates engine house from the beach at Chapel Porth 35mm f/8 1/320 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerSpacer


Jökulsárlón Revisited..

Jokulsarlon, glacial lagoon, Iceland

At this time of year, the sun barely dips below the horizon in Iceland so it doesn’t truly get dark.  Sunset and sunrise are within about four hours of each other and during this time, twilight prevails.  I decided it would be nice to visit Jökulsárlón again at dawn so after just a couple of hours sleep, we set off from Höfn for the hour-long drive.  My previous visit to this glacial lagoon was a couple of months ago and you can see details of that visit here and here.

Despite there being much less ice in the lagoon itself this time, there was still plenty of ice on the beach as you can see from the pictures.  I was doing very well at keeping clear of the waves until the wave in the first picture surged ashore.  To say the water was cold is an understatement.  I’ve been soaked many times taking pictures on the beaches around Cornwall.  This particular soaking is one I’ll remember for a long time.  For the next few hours, I drove the car barefoot whilst my hiking boots and socks dried in front of the heater vents.  Click on the images for a clearer sharper view! :-)

Jokulsarlon, glacial lagoon, Iceland35mm f/7.1 1/100 sec. ISO-100

SpacerDSC_6456A70mm f/13 1/30 sec. ISO-50

SpacerJokulsarlon, glacial lagoon, Iceland35mm f/4 1/160 sec. ISO-100

SpacerJokulsarlon, glacial lagoon, Iceland35mm f/4 1/160 sec. ISO-100

SpacerJokulsarlon, glacial lagoon, Iceland37mm f/5.6 1/125 sec. ISO-100

SpacerJokulsarlon, glacial lagoon, Iceland70mm f/5.6 1/160 sec. ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerSpacer


Stokksnes and Horn

Old wrecked Fishing Boat, Stokksness and Horn, Iceland

Last Saturday, I met up with a good friend Runólfur Hauksson aka Ronnie, and spent a couple of days taking photographs and getting to know the area around Höfn (pronounced Hup as in up) a great deal better.  I visited Stokksness and Horn back at the beginning of March and you can see my post from that time here. It was great to be visiting again and meeting up with such good friends.

A little local knowledge is a wonderful thing and Ronnie took me to the well hidden site of a wrecked fishing boat that has lain in this spot for the past 100 years.  The boat made a fabulous subject for a photograph and added that little something extra to my photos of this very dramatic piece of coastline so, thank you once again my friend, for this and many more photographs I have yet to process. It was a great couple of days!

As you can see, I was struggling to choose between these the images so decided to post them all.  Please click on the images for a clearer, sharper view.  Perhaps you have a favourite..

Old wrecked Fishing Boat, Stokksness and Horn, Iceland24mm f/11 1/80 sec. ISO-50

SpacerOld wrecked Fishing Boat, Stokksness and Horn, Iceland24mm f/10 1/160 sec. ISO-50

SpacerOld wrecked Fishing Boat, Stokksness and Horn, Iceland24mm f/11 1/80 sec ISO-50

SpacerOld wrecked Fishing Boat, Stokksness and Horn, Iceland24mm f/10 1/160 ISO-50

SpacerOld wrecked Fishing Boat, Stokksness and Horn, Iceland24mm f/10 1/320 sec. ISO-50

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2SpacerSpacer


Of Castles, Jugglers, Mountains and Mist

This is a further collection of photographs taken on my recent trip to Inverness.  Having taken pictures at Eilean Donan castle, we drove over the bridge to the Isle of skye.  In the 8th picture, with the Old Man of Storr in the background, you’ll notice a boat, halfway up a mountain.  It seemed incongruous, as did the man who appeared as I was taking pictures and started a very impressive display of juggling in his garden.  Click on the images for a clearer sharper view of the photographs!  :-)

DSC005441fr35mm f/11 1/100 sec. ISO-100

Spacer

DSC00231Afr35mm f/8 1/125 sec. ISO-100

SpacerDSC00295fr35mm f/10 1/160 sec. ISO-100

Spacer

DSC00305fr35mm f/10 1/160 sec. ISO-100

SpacerDSC00270Afr35mm f/11 1/125 sec. ISO-100

SpacerDSC00510fr35mm f/10 1/250 sec. ISO-100

Spacer

DSC00314fr35mm f/8 1/160 sec. ISO-100SpacerDSC00609fr35mm f/11 1/125 sec ISO-100

SpacerDSC00661fr35mm f/11 1/800 sec. ISO-100

 

DSC006551fr35mm f/11 1/160 ISO-100

SpacerAdrian Theze Photo logo_2Spacer


Jökulsárlón

Icebergs on the beach at Jökulsárlón

I’ve posted before about Jökulsárlón.  Jökulsárlón is a glacial lake fed by the same glacier, Vatnajökull, that I spoke about in my last post.  Huge icebergs that calve from the glacier edge, float in this lake, some for many years until finally, currents send them on their way to the sea. You can see my first post from the lake here.  It was also at  Jökulsárlón that I saw the seals lazing on the ice and I posted those photographs here.

Visiting for the second time, I found my way onto the beach where some of these icebergs, having made it to the sea, are then washed up onto the black volcanic sand. Huge diamond like chunks of ice litter the beach for hundreds of yards.  I happily spent a couple of hours, watching the action of the waves on these huge blocks of ice.  These are the photographs I took whilst contemplating this beautiful spectacle.

Icebergs on the beach at Jökulsárlón, Iceland45mm f/22 60 sec. ISO-50

SpacerIcebergs on the beach at Jökulsárlón48mm f/22 1/50 sec ISO-50

SpacerIcebergs on the beach at Jökulsárlón24mm f/22 1/30 sec. ISO-50

Leaving the lake behind we soon hit the blizzard that was looming on the horizon in the photographs above.  Looking for petrol, we came upon a frozen waterfall, Systrafoss, (sister falls) cascading down smooth rock at Kirkjubæjarklaustur.  With the snow falling so heavily, we clearly weren’t seeing it at its best and is definitely on the list of places to visit next time..

Kirkjubæjarklaustur58mm f/8 1/125 sec. ISO-50

Spacer

Adrian Theze Photo logo_2

Spacer

 


Cornish Sunset..

It feels like an age since I posted some pictures from Cornwall so here are some pictures I took last evening.  As the sun started to go down, it really looked promising so I suggested to Poppy of www.poppytump.wordpress.com (who is visiting at the moment) that we go over to Constantine Bay to watch the sunset.  We were not disappointed!

Constantine Bay Sunset35mm f/11 1/60 sec. ISO-100

spaceConstantine Bay35mm f/11 1/25 sec. ISO-100

spaceConstantine Bay35mm f/11 1/20 sec. ISO-100

space

We were not the only ones to head to Constantine Bay.  The beach was lined with people just watching and taking pictures with just about every device capable of taking a picture imaginable.  This person was happy just to sit on the fence and watch however..Constantine Bay35mm f/11 1/6 sec. ISO-100

spaceAdrian Theze Photo logo_2space