Posts tagged “Wheal Coates

Book Covers

I was informed today of another two book covers I can add to my name.  One of the books is  La Tour de Malvent by Gilbert Bordes.  The cover can be seen below.  This cover is taken from a photograph I took of Roche Rock (A print of which hangs in my hall) taken a mile from my then home in Cornwall.  This hermitage and chapel dates back to the 12th century and was used as a location in the Hollywood Film, Omen III – The Final Conflict.  It’s an interesting place to visit and has a lot of history and folklore surrounding it.  Having been there before first light for a dawn shoot, I can testify it’s not somewhere you really want to visit, in the dark, on your own.  The imagination really does start to do overtime. :-)

The other, Ildarnet by S. K. Tremayne is to be published in Denmark and I do not have a copy of that cover yet.  However, it is the same image that was used for my first ever book cover.  The photograph, one of my favourites of all time, I’ve included below.  This picture has been incredibly good to me.  Regular followers of my blog will have seen it quite a few times now.  This was one of the first pictures I took when I picked up a digital camera for the first time, just under four years ago.

The picture happened.  It was a cold, grey, miserable day in December and for those of you who know Cornwall, you’ll know just how miserable that can be.  However, I’d ordered myself a Christmas present from Amazon.  I had my shiny new Nikon D7000 and I was going to get out there and take pictures regardless of the weather..

As it turned out, I was in the right place at the right time.  The conditions, that on the face of it were not particularly promising, proved to be perfect. As I was setting up my tripod on the sand, a shaft of sunlight broke through the heavy cloud, hit the engine house and I had my picture.  I’ve been chasing such conditions ever since. This is why it’s so important to just get out there and take pictures. The more pictures you take the better.  You just never know when you’re going to be in the right place at the right time to capture that special image.

If you’re considering joining an agency to make your pictures available for things like book covers, check the small print.  Make sure that you know what you’re signing up for and what rights you might be signing away.

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Summer..

This is a photograph of the Wheal Coates engine house from the beach at Chapel Porth

We’ve been having some very pleasant sunny days here in Cornwall over the last couple of weeks.  The wind has been cold which has kept the edge off the heat which for me is a positive thing.  MS Symptoms are exacerbated by the heat, perhaps this is why I’m enjoying Iceland so much.  The weather today is warm, muggy, dull and wet, quite a change so I’d thought I’d cheer myself up and process a picture I took of one of my favourite signature view down on Chapel Porth beach the other morning.  The tide was coming in allowing me to capture a nice reflection of the Wheal Coates engine house in the sand. Wet feet were the inevitable side effect but it was worth it I think.  Hopefully the sun will be back with us by Sunday..

This is a photograph of the Wheal Coates engine house from the beach at Chapel Porth 35mm f/8 1/320 sec. ISO-100

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Wheal Coates Revisited Once Again..

I found myself at Wheal Coats again this week.  A severe gale was blowing making it very difficult to stand.  It was the tail end of a hurricane I believe.  With my tripod blowing over before I’d had chance to attach my camera you should get some idea of just how windy it was.

However, I did manage to take a couple of pictures.  I will now ask the question often asked in photography blogs, black and white or colour?  I’ve taken this shot before at 24mm.  The black and white version won first in a Nikon photography competition so I am drawn to the black and white image but I’m also very drawn to the greens and blues in the colour version.  I do like the way the wider angle lens has given this version of the picture a greater sense of space.

I guess I don’t have to choose, you don’t have to choose either, I hope you can enjoy both pictures but I would be interested in your opinion just the same.  Click on the images for a clearer sharper view.. :-)

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Wheal Coates Revisited..

There is no doubt that I will keep returning to this beach time after time.  Chapel Porth has got to be one of my favourite places to be.  The beach only appears during spring tides that coincide with the full moon.  During spring tides, the difference between the highest and the lowest tide is at its greatest.  Neap tides, where there is little change between high tide and low tide, coincide with the new moon.  Between new moon and full moon, the height of the tide at its lowest and highest, changes a little each day.  Tide tables come in very handy when planning shoots, along with the weather forecast of course.

The day these photographs were taken, the tide was at its lowest at around 11.30 in the morning and on a beautiful September day, the shots I got weren’t the shots I was hoping for but I was quite pleased with these nonetheless.  Waiting patiently for the moment the tide dropped low enough to be able to get onto this part of the beach, I was there before anybody else.

I hope you enjoy the pictures as much as I enjoyed taking them.  It’s a long time since I had a paddle in the ocean usually preferring the Wellington boot to taking my shoes and socks off and rolling up my trouser legs but on this day, I couldn’t resist.. Click on the pictures for a clearer sharper view :-)

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Un-Spam Us!!

Having recently done battle with the ‘Happiness Engineers’ and the ‘Likes’ police (How many Likes is too Many) I’ve now had to go head to head with the Spam Police, those awfully nice people at Akismet who, in there overly zealous attempts to protect us from the occasional spam comment, are dumping perfectly good, honest, decent comments in our spam folders. I’ve just had to retrieve over a dozen from my spam folder and having spent a great deal of time recently writing many, well thought out, thoroughly considered and appreciative comment on someone’s work only to see it disappear before my very eyes as it’s whisked away and dumped where few people care to look, the spam folder, I’m getting pretty fed up.

I know it’s always a case of the few spoil it for the many but can we not deal with the ‘likes’ that come from people looking to solicit something from us and those that ‘like’ to get likes back?  They’re easy enough to spot.  Are WordPress users really complaining so loudly about this that WordPress’s reaction to ration our ‘likes’ is justified?  The same goes for the spam comment.  It’s easy enough to dump them in the trash.  In trying to stop what is really a reality of the world we live in, WordPress are starting to make this platform unusable for decent, honest bloggers like you and me.

While they figure that out for themselves as, surely as night follows day, they’re not going to listen to us, all we can do is check our spam folders daily and like in moderation hoping, as I hope, that we all understand we’re there, following and reading and appreciating the posts we read daily anyway, we just can’t necessarily show it. :-)

If you’re struggling with this as I am, you can contact Akismet at support@akismet.com and the happiness engineers at support@wordpress.com. I’m sure they’d be happy to hear from you ;-)

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Wheal Coates Revisited..

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